Syllable Division Rules

  1. Separate prefixes and suffixes from root words.
    • examplespre-view, work-ing, re-do, end-less, & out-ing
  2. Are two (or more) consonants next to each other?
    • Divide between the 1st and 2nd consonants.
      • examples:  buf-fet, des-sert, ob-ject, ber-ry, & pil-grim
    • Never split 2 consonants that make only 1 sound when pronounced together and aren't the same letter (i.e., 'ff').
      • examplesth, sh, ph, th, ch, & wh
  3. Is the consonant surrounded by vowels?
    • Does the vowel have a long sound?  (Like the 'i' in line)
      • Divide before the consonant.
      • examples:  ba-by, re-sult, i-vy, fro-zen, & Cu-pid
    • Does the vowel have a short sound?  (Like the 'i' in mill)
      • Divide after the consonant.
      • examples:  met-al, riv-er, mod-el, val-ue, & rav-age
  4. Does the word end with 'ckle'?
    • Divide right before the 'le.'
    • examples:  tack-le, freck-le, tick-le, & buck-le
  5. Does the word end with 'le' (not 'ckle')?
    • Is the letter before the 'le' a consonant?
      • Divide 1 letter before the 'le.'
      • examples:  ap-ple, rum-ble, fa-ble, & ta-ble
    • Is the letter before the 'le' a vowel?
      • Do nothing.
      • examplesale, scale, sale, file, & tile
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Fun Fact
80% of all the data stored on
computers is in English.

Examples

  • little:   lit - tle
  • petal:   pet - al
  • turtle:   tur - tle
  • ankle:   an - kle
  • riddle:   rid - dle
  • arrow:   ar - row
  • nickle:   nick - le
  • cotton:   cot - ton
  • student:   stu - dent
  • teacher:   teach - er
  • children:   chil - dren
  • pottery:   pot - ter - y
  • learning:   learn - ing
  • textbook:   text - book
  • watching:   watch - ing
  • screaming:   scream - ing
  • misbehaving:   mis - be - hav - ing
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